Thom Yorke’s Clichés: Part 2

A few weeks ago I put up a blog post detailing some of the details behind Thom Yorke’s lyrics, and why they’re successful, despite appearing childishly simple on the surface. Since then there’s been a surprise album drop from the man himself (yes, another one), and a few tweets that hint at his compositional process in more detail than the scatterbrained websites Radiohead have maintained in years past. Here’s my update.

Twitter

Via the magic of social media, we’ve been granted an insight into the way Thom Yorke writes his lyrics, the sort of insight that was previously restricted to the gatekeepers (as Yorke might call them) of a BBC documentary series like Arena. In any case, it’s safe to assume these notes represent an early brainstorming, one of the first points at which he commits pen to paper. It’s an unconventional approach, dividing the page into columns down which he seems to be transcribing thoughts and phrases as they come into his head, and then paring them down to cut out the chaff. Instead of plotting the lyrics along the linear path of a narrative, there’s a scattergun approach, firing words at the page without discriminating, and then trying to unlock a coherent pattern among them. The overall system is like the embodiment of apophenia. It’s a helpful writing tool, but it also says a lot about Yorke’s persona poised against the system -even drafting lyrics requires a negotiation with overwhelming, faceless ‘data’, and trying to understand if any inherent patterns have value, or if they are completely arbitrary. It’s quite Pynchonian in that respect, and shows a measure of influence from that author which goes beyond the band name-dropping him with W.A.S.T.E (the name is lifted from an organisation in Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49). As I mentioned in the earlier article, you have to sideline your expectations of one persona speaking to you, of telling a story from their account. Yorke is what DH Lawrence might have called a ‘pipe open at both ends’, allowing all parts of the system to emerge from his larynx. Here’s a transcription, with idioms also highlighted in red:

taxpayers Traffic jams All of us A broken spell I’m no saint
managers Cheques to sign Have turned to stone A dried up well Clutching straws
Catching up Call waiting Don’t slack off Holding patterns No idea
Britney spears Book onlines Or the penny drops In a queue Where to start
All his work Burned out lights And taken away Rotten fruit Why ask me?
Will have Flames to fan All the names & vegetables As if i’d know
Been in vain Warrantees All the names Leaves that fall Waiting outside
Coming at you coming [?] for you What’s the warning On leaves that fall The swimming pool
From beyond From beyond Who can hear? On leaves that fall As if it helps
The trees The trees On leaves that fall As if it helps
Beyond the trees Beyond the trees Click your fingers More hot air
I have indeed

 

Yet more shit Tickertape Then up in smoke In the balloon
Your holiness

 

I do not want need Message reads A teleport Disconnected
Chasing tales Stomach cramps Voice [?] looking at you A sick joke Frightened
Borrowed time Chattering teeth From beyond the trees Any which way Reverberating
Fossilised

 

Hollow words Beyond the trees Just don’t stop Hollow sounds
Specks of dust

 

On the breeze Big deal so what? Don’t give in Strict demands
Glowing orbs Vessels to fill The present tense Don’t let up Upon my time
Twisted frames

 

Vessels to fill Is all you got Self-improvement Responsible
Weakest links

 

Hovering [?] birds of All his work Life coach Adult
All this time Birds of prey Will have been in vain Motivated Stay in line
Struggling Can’t let go Multiplied Coming at you Motivated Stay in line
Fighting for On motorways From beyond the grave Sales force Need to fulfil
A little patch Teenagers Beyond the grave Sales force Deadlines
A little earth On my tail Tooth and nail Don’t slack off deadlines
With wood & stone [slime] They [?] think it’s a race Agoneeze [?] Or the penny drops Musst make
Wood store [slime] All this love Platinum cards All this work best
The present tense Will have been Freebees Will come to nought Use of my time
Is all you got

 

In vain Stamps 2 lick Mirrors in Robots in
Why waste time

 

Can be taken Checking lists Changing rooms In disguise
Breaking up?

 

from you Decisions decisions We think we In disguise
Lights that dance

 

At any time This with this [?] Have an opening Never here
Around your eyes At any time Such & such Come but next Somewhere else
You won’t know where Wants this by when? A better break Waiting here
You won’t know why Yesterday A better break Wait for you
Feed the greed Yesterday Hollow fake Waiting for
Don’t stop now yesterday Reverberate The states to change
Don’t turned around All this talk Wind 2 change
All this mouth Bottomless pit
The truth is love Bottomless pit
I’m uncertain

Even at this early stage you can see some of the subversion at work, as ‘chasing tales’ continues the invective of ‘The Daily Mail’ into a pun that sends up journalists let off the leash to find stories, who only end up chasing their own tails and perpetuating a cycle. Most of the notes are nowhere near what ended up in the final version, but it’s telling that one of the few that did is ‘the penny drops’, showing that the idiom provides the foundation on which the song rests – it is one of the few phrases which made it from ‘early notes’ into the final version, indicating that Yorke does find them an interesting sub-section of language. There’s a lot to be mined from the list, but just to mention one more thing at the moment: the refrain of ‘beyond the trees’ hasn’t been sung in any performance (yet), but it’s circling around the idiom ‘can’t see the wood for the trees’ – saying ‘beyond the trees’ several times over shows the wilful attempt to escape from the labyrinth of pre-programmed language. On that note, something incredibly simple that I missed last time is just how many times phrases are repeated on Hail to the Thief compared to Radiohead’s other releases. I’ve tallied them below, not counting the occasions where lines are delivered in pairs (see ‘Myxomatosis, ‘A Wolf At The Door’ and ‘The Gloaming’ for this)

Song Phrase Tally
2+2=5 Paying attention 13
I’m not 11
Sit Down. Stand Up. Sit down, stand up 11
Anytime 4
The rain drops 46
Sail to the Moon Sail us to the moon 4
Backdrifts You fell into our arms 5
Go to Sleep Over my dead body 4
Were I End And You Begin I will eat you alive 15
There’ll be no more lies 12
The Gloaming They will suck you down to the other side 4
They should be ringing 12
There There Don’t reach out 4
Someone on your shoulder 4
I Will Eyes 15
A Punchup At A Wedding No 44+
A Wolf at the Door The flan in the face 4
Put me inside 5
No I have no idea, but a lot

It’s proof that Yorke’s pessimism about political control of language reached its saturation around the time of their sixth album, particularly as he hadn’t used repetition in such a heavy way before, or since (outside of choruses, obviously).

Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes

Brain In A Bottle  I just keep bouncing back
Guess Again  As one door shuts/Another opens
Mother Lode  Your truth is out of their league + hits the ground running

Quite aside from giving us the most Yorkesque album title yet, Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes gives us three more instances of idioms. All of the idioms here are ostensibly used in a positive context, but the fact that they are idioms in the first place negates the effect. Yorke has already deconstructed the optimism of ‘bouncing back’ back in 1997 with ‘Let Down’ (bouncing back and one day/I am going to grow wings/A chemical reaction/Hysterical and useless…), and ‘As one door shuts, another opens’ is another positive-sounding phrase, but given that the song has already described ‘all my nightmares’ and ‘wild dogs’, there’s something else going on. The phrase moves away from an Apprentice style soundbite into a domesticated labyrinth, where another door opening is not an exit, but another layer of confusion that helps the ‘mind blow up’. Same with ‘Mother Lode’: ‘hit the ground running’ is particularly loved by corporate employers, so recalibrating the phrase is another middle finger to Yorke’s favourite nemesis, the middle management. In the context of this song, hitting the ground running is like the doors in Guess Again – a myxomatosic twitching, trying to escape from surrounding darkness. If you look at the grid above that I transcribed from Twitter, it does seem that Yorke is particularly interested in deconstructing such corporate language which deigns to help the individual achieve their potential, but really only perpetuates a system full of suited drones.

Notes for ‘The Present Tense’ include ‘self-improvement’ and ‘life coach’. I worried over the last few years, as Thom Yorke grew his hair, spent more time in Los Angeles, and hung out with cool EDM artists, that he would drift from the acid-tongued, alien looking man I idolised in my youthful naïveté. Still, it’s helpful to know that while he seems a much more contented soul now, he’s still capable of piercing the particularly Los Angeles brand of vapid personalised bullshit.

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